Little Strongbark   Bourreria cassinifolia

Little strongbark is a shrub originating in pinelands of South Florida, the Keys and the Caribbean.  People immediately fall in love with it when they see it.  Why? It's adorable!  It can be used as an accent plant, or as part of low screening, especially in sunny locations.  It's not an overly aggressive grower, so it can be artfully combined with other sun-loving plants.

Typical mature size is 7 feet high by 5 feet wide.  Responds well to trimming, and can be shaped by pruning; no hedging allowed.

Little strongbark is a superb wildlife attractant.  Hummingbirds, butterflies, and an assortment of insects are irresistibly drawn to the nectar.  Most of the steady stream of visitors are too shy or skittish to pose for  photographs, but this one bee (see photos below) was deeply engrossed in satiating itself, and took no notice of me.

Orange fruits, popular with birds, add an irresistible sensation of jovial camaraderie.

For the best effect, plant them in full/partial sun.  If  planted in too much shade, they will creep along the ground, trying to escape out to the sun.

At left, is a long-tailed skipper, happily slurping up some nectar.  What more proof do you need that this is one of those must have plants?

We've got some nice ones in 3-gal., about 30"-36" high (below left).

Out of stock: 10-gal., 40"-48" high (see photo below for what they might look like when we do have 'em).

   

The photo at right is of Bourreria huanita, which is a cousin of our little strongbark from Central America. 

The photo was sent to us by Dr. Miguel F. Torres, of Guatemala, who has written a book on the ethnobotany of this species.  This particular specimen was reportedly planted more than 300 hundred years ago.  

Dr. Torres informs us that this is considered to be a sacred tree.  In pre-deodorant days, Aztec "...princesses bathed in water perfumed with the white flowers of..." this tree (now that you know that, you won't be able to resist doing the same thing with your little strongbark flowers).   

   

 

 

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Screening
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Home
Botanical Tags
Butterfly Host Plants
Cardinals at the nursery
Coastal
Cold Damage
Driving Directions
Feedback
Fragrant Plants
Groundcovers
Hammock
In the Shadehouse
Invasive Plants
Landscaping for Hurricanes
Managing Your Plants
Mealybug Destroyers
Misc. Tropical Plants
Our Nursery
Plant Archives
Plant List
Landscaping Jobs
References
Screening
Search Page
Services
Shipping
Stone Planters
Stoppers
Street Trees
What About the Environment?
Wildlife at Plant Creations
Xerophytes
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Last updated:  6/21/2012